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Projects - Birds - Forums


                                                  MAY'S BIRD OF THE MONTH

     AUSTRALIAN OWLET-NIGHTJAR  -  photo by Jack Whiting

                                                                                                

                                                                        

  
I remember the day we got our first sighting of the Owlet-nightjar along the South Pine River (SPR) and just days later while on one of our official SPR Surveys it appeared again and the whole group got to see this wonderful little bird. This was the day the bird was officially added to the SPR Bird Life database.

We were fortunate enough to have it stay around for a few months using the same roost on the lip of the same tree hollow. Unfortunately too many people got to know about the bird and when they came to view it and it was not on display they were using methods, that we frowned upon, to get the bird out of its hollow. Eventually the Owlet-nightjar had had enough and moved on but we are happy to say that it is back and has at least one and possibly two other birds with it. A couple of new roosting sites are being used as well as a couple of man-made nest boxes. It is common for Owlet-nightjars to regularly use a couple of roosting sites.

Owlet-nightjars come in two forms. The most common in our region is a mid grey with rufous face markings and wing edges. The other is the rufous morph which is more likely to be found in the north west of the country. Both the grey rufous and the rufous morph sexes are alike. Young birds have less distinct markings around the head area but all birds have very distinctive large dark eyes. The feathering on young and juvenile birds has a soft almost fur like appearance. The Owlet-nightjar is Australia's smallest nocturnal bird and is found right across the country.  

 

by Jack Whiting  - 

Wonderful member of the Pine Rivers Catchment Association and active volunteer and member of the Birders of the South Pine River :)    

 

 

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Catchment Coordinator
Ph: (07) 3325 1577
Mob: 0438 199 102
Email:
catchmentcoordinator@prca.org.au

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Catchment Coordinator
Ph: (07) 3325 1577
Mob: 0438 199 102
Email:
catchmentcoordinator@prca.org.au